One month on…

Wow!  It has been a busy month here at Allergy Towers.  I have been jumping through hoops, like an overexcited collie in an agility competition.  I am really pleased to say that I passed my Level 2 in Food Hygiene and Handling.  We also passed our Food Standards Agency inspection, and got the top grade (5, very good).

20180622_105948We have been testing lots of vegan, gluten free cakes, including a gin cake with tonic icing that I felt the need to test extensively.  Our testing panel have been generous with their time and taste buds, and supportive.  Yesterday, we delivered our first batch to Cornflower Wholefoods, Brightlingsea, Essex, UK.  I don’t know how well the cakes will sell, but we are going to give it our best shot.

The next stage will be about fulfilling our whole purpose.  We’ll be looking at developing relationships with local organisations so we can offer work-related learning to autistic young people.

It’s all really exciting, bit scary, but I am looking forward to seeing what happens over the next few months…

 

 

Jungle Adventure – Stanway, Essex, UK

The Allergy Brothers conveniently only have a few days between their birthdays, and just less than two years between their ages.  This means they are cursed to have shared birthday parties forever!  Luckily, they get on very well and have shared friends and interests.

This year the boys’ party was at Jungle Adventure in Stanway, Colchester.  This is our favourite soft play centre.  It’s light, clean, and well-maintained.  There is a wide range of equipment so it’s very accessible.  Our only complaints are that the music can be too loud, especially if you sit at the sides, and that the Allergy Brothers might be aging out of Jungle Adventure.  Is it too much to ask for the Jungle Adventure team to open a centre for older children too?!

Birthday parties can be a bit sad for us, because everyone, except the birthday boys, can eat the party food.  The Allergy Brothers usually have to bring a packed lunch.  We were really pleased that the Jungle Adventure staff worked so hard to cater for them.  The Allergy Brothers each had a platter of ham and vegetable batons, with crisps and tortilla chips.  For dessert, they each had a bowl of fresh fruit.

Finally, we want to thank unflappable party host, Teni, who was so calm and efficient.

The Allergy Brothers definitely had a happy birthday party.

What the food is Spirulina?!

I spend a bit, honestly a lot, of time everyday being amazed by food photography on Instagram.  I always want to reach into my screen and take a bite!  I have been wondering how people made food such intense and beautiful blues.  I noticed these photos are often tagged Spirulina or Blue Spirulina.  What the food is Spirulina?!

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Is Spirulina a natural product?

Yes, Spirulina is a generic term for blue-green algae that grow in some salt-water and also fresh-water lakes in Africa and South America.

Why is Spirulina used in food products?

Spirulina is used as a dietary supplement, due to its high levels of protein, vitamins and minerals.  It is also used as a way of adding some really beautiful, natural colours to foods.
Is Spirulina safe to eat?

Spirulina itself is safe to eat, but Spirulina harvested from the natural environment may be contaminated with toxins or heavy metals.  This is further complicated by its status as a dietary supplement, which means it isn’t regulated to the same degree as a food.

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Spirulina should not be eaten by people with Phenylkeptonuria as it is a source of phenylalanine.  If you have a thyroid condition, an autoimmune disorder, gout, kidney stones, or are pregnant or nursing, spirulina may not be appropriate for you. You should check with your healthcare provider before taking it.
Can Spirulina cause allergic reactions?

Potentially, especially in those who are allergic to seafood, seaweed and other sea vegetables.
Is Spirulina vegan?

Spirulina is a cyanobacteria, a blue-green algae, so it is made up of tiny single-celled bacteria.  These bacteria make their food through photosynthesis, just like plants do.  Spirulina is not really an animal or a plant, but seems to be generally viewed as acceptable for vegans to eat.

Easter Nests (GF, DF, Vegan)

The Allergy Brothers made these Easter nests with chocolate eggs at school, using our recipe.  It’s really great that the boys are always included in their class’ cooking.

Ingredients

75g margarine (we used Pure sunflower brand)

50g golden syrup

100g dark chocolate (we used Kinnerton free from chocolate)

100g breakfast cereal (we used gluten free flakes and Nature’s Path Munch)

mini chocolate eggs (we used Lindt dark chocolate mini eggs)

Method

  1. Line a muffin tray with cases.
  2. Melt the margarine and golden syrup in a pan.  Reduce the heat to low, add the chocolate, and stir until the chocolate has melted.
  3. Remove from the heat, mix in the cereal, and stir until it is all chocolatey.
  4. Spoon into the muffin cases and make an indent in the centre. Place an egg in each nest.
  5. Chill the nests until they are firm.