New Year Carrot Cake

If you have made a New Year’s resolution to eat more healthily then this is the recipe for you.

Ingredients

550g Free From Fairy self raising flour

225g maple syrup

275ml water

350g carrots, grated

175g sultanas

1 tbsp vanilla extract

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C, 350°F, Gas Mark 4.
  2. Sift the flour.  Combine the liquids, then stir into the flour mixture.
  3. Fold in the remaining ingredients, then pour into a lightly-oiled/lined cake tin.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 35-45 minutes.
  5. Leave to cool.20171201_132300

I removed a portion of the cake for Allergy Dad to eat without topping.  I used Betty Crocker Cream Cheese style frosting on the top with a sprinkling of cinnamon, which completely ruined the point of a healthy cake.  It’s the thought that counts, though…

 

Christmas Tree Tear-and-Share Bread

This is a really simple, but effective idea.  You need to start with bread dough made from approximately 400g of flour.  I used Orgran Pizza and Pastry Multimix.  The Free From Fairy’s bread dough recipe would work too.  Of course, you lucky gluten eaters could just use wheat flour dough!

Take your bread dough and split it into two.  Take one half and split it into two pieces.  Then split each of those pieces into three smaller balls.  You should now have one big ball of dough and six little balls of dough.

Take two of the little balls.  They are going to be the trunk of the Christmas tree.  I used the bread dough as it was.  If you can eat cheese then topping those two rolls with cheese would give a nice, brown trunk.  Put these dough balls on a baking tray lined with baking parchment.

Now, you need to make the “baubles”.  Take three of the small balls and colour them by mixing in a red ingredient.  I used Pepperami to decorate these rolls.  If you can eat tomato then adding sun-dried tomato paste to the balls will give them a much stronger colour.  Put these three “baubles” to one side.

You should have the big ball of dough and one small ball of dough left.  Squish these together and colour these green by kneading in spinach.  I used 80g of frozen chopped spinach.  I defrosted this and squeezed the moisture out of the spinach before adding it to the dough.  You now need to split the big ball of green dough into seven small balls.  I did this by roughly separating the dough into two.  I split the “bigger half” into four small balls, and the “smaller half” into three small balls.

Now, you have seven green dough balls and three red dough balls.  Lay these out on top of the trunk in a 4 ball, 3 ball, 2 ball, 1 ball triangle shape.

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Finally, bake the Christmas tree as per your dough recipe.  I baked my tear-and-share bread at 200°C/400°F for 15 minutes.

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The Free From Fairy Flours

Firstly thanks to fellow Allergy Mum, Helen, for sharing this company with me.  The Free From Fairy makes wholegrain, gluten-free, wheat-free, and, crucially for us, rice-free flour blends.  Whoop!  I was eager to try this.  The plain flour blend contains teff, sorghum and buckwheat flours, and tapioca and potato starch.  We already knew that the boys can tolerate teff, buckwheat, tapioca and potato so sorghum was the only dicey ingredient.  For this reason, I wanted to start simple with a basic bread recipe using just water (350ml), yeast (2 tsp), olive oil (6tbsp), xanthan gum (1 1/2 tsp), salt (1tsp), and, of course, Free From Fairy plain flour (450g).  Inspired by the recipe on the side of the packet, which we sadly couldn’t follow exactly as it contained Allergy Brother allergens, I made a tear and share bread.  I hadn’t thought to do this before and the boys enjoyed the novelty of sharing food with us.

The first test is always “did anyone react to the food?” and I am very pleased to report that no one did.  The second test was flavour and texture.  The bread was soft inside with a good crust.  The teff flour gave the flour blend a pleasant, sour dough flavour.  This wasn’t as overpowering as just using teff flour on its own, which is a bit of an acquired taste.  As a final test, I left one piece of bread for the next day to try at breakfast to see how it saves.  It was edible, but definitely not as enjoyable as the evening before so I don’t think I could use it to make sandwiches for the boys to take to school.  Nonetheless, this was a good product that I was pleased to be introduced to.  I have some plans to test the flours in sweet baking as well soon so I shall report back further!